Ohio agriculture has stern message for Gov. Kasich and water quality

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Gov. John Kasich appears ready to abandon his common sense approach to governance while ignoring the voluntary conservation efforts, scientific research and mandatory compliance efforts Ohio farm families are implementing to improve water quality.A group of leading Ohio agricultural organizations is calling on Kasich to engage the industry in his administration’s approach to protecting Lake Erie.The governor and his representatives have been quoted in the media saying they plan to place restrictions on farming practices through executive order.Farmers and agribusiness leaders, who supported Kasich’s “Common Sense Initiative,” are unhappy that the governor appears ready to disregard the promises made on his first day in office. His executive order that created the Common Sense Initiative states “agencies should develop regulations in the full light of public scrutiny, and the public should have an opportunity to help shape those regulations.”“From what we understand, the governor has not talked to lawmakers or anyone who will have to deal with the consequences of an executive order. I can tell you for a fact, any decision is being made without input from the ag community,” said Tadd Nicholson, executive director of Ohio Corn & Wheat Growers Association.Leaders of the Ohio AgriBusiness Association, Ohio Cattlemen’s Association, Ohio Corn & Wheat Growers Association, Ohio Dairy Producers Association, Ohio Farm Bureau, Ohio Pork Council, Ohio Poultry Association, Ohio Sheep Improvement Association and Ohio Soybean Association are frustrated that the Kasich administration has not engaged the industry in such a consequential matter. The groups believe the executive action will create broad controls over farmers who are working to reduce nutrient runoff that contributes to algae formation in Lake Erie. It likely will closely mirror legislation the administration previously attempted to introduce but failed when it was unable to secure a sponsor.Separate legislation, called Clean Lake 2020, has gained the support of lawmakers, farmers and members of the environmental community. It unanimously passed in the Ohio Senate and Ohio House and is headed to the governor. The farm groups would like to see the Kasich administration embrace the legislation, which reflects the Common Sense Initiative’s stated priority of “compliance, not punishment.”Adam Sharp, executive vice president of Ohio Farm Bureau, said the agriculture groups have an open door to policymakers who want to take a collaborative approach to dealing with an extremely complex challenge.“The importance of fixing the lake’s problems cannot be overstated. Going about it the right way is equally important,” Sharp said. “We can help the lake without hurting our ability to produce food and create jobs.”last_img read more

In Colorado, Even the Rain Is Spoken For

first_imgResidents in California and other Western states are being encouraged to capture rainfall and use it to water their gardens, relieving municipal supplies and wells from some of the pressure being felt as the region continues to suffer a crippling drought.When the city of Los Angeles offered 1,000 rain barrels to residents last November, they disappeared in no time.But not in Colorado. It’s the only state in the country where it remains mostly illegal for homeowners to connect a rain barrel to gutters and downspouts so they can keep lawns and gardens green. An article in The New York Times reports that the state’s complex water laws strictly regulate who gets what — even when the water falls from the sky.“Where does it stop?” asked Jason Story, who plans to use a 30-gallon drum to collect rainwater at his Denver home. “Does that mean you own the cloud, too?”It may not make much sense to those from water-rich states, but Colorado State Senator Jerry Sonnenberg, from a farming and ranching town in northeast Colorado, likened the use of rain barrels to stealing. A barrel of rainwater might not seem like much, he told The Times, but collectively the diversion of a substantial amount of rainwater would be damaging to those living downstream.Joe Frank, of the Lower South Platte Water Conservancy District, said that the state is typically short of water. “Even in average years, there’s not enough water to go around,” he told the newspaper. Efforts to revise the law failA small number of people were exempted from the rain barrel ban a few years ago, including those who don’t have access to municipal water, but efforts to broaden the exemption to everyone who could get their hands on a rain barrel failed in the state legislature this spring. The Denver Posts’s website reported in May that the effort to give more people the right to use rain barrels died on the last day of the legislative session.The bill would have allowed homeowners to collect rainwater from their roofs in two rain barrels as long as certain conditions were met — barrels could have a combined storage capacity of 100 gallons or less, for example, and the water had to be used on the property to irrigate lawns and gardens.Although the bill rounded up a lot of support, it ultimately failed.“It’s like growing flowers,” Senator Sonnenberg said at the time. “You can’t go over and pick your neighbors’ flowers just because you’re only picking a few. They’re not your flowers.”Although the practice may be technically illegal for most state residents, enforcement is said to be lax and scofflaws are in little danger of being fined.A spokesman for the state’s Department of Natural Resources said he didn’t know of a single instance of a homeowner being fined for having a rain barrel, The Times said. “We simply do not have the ability to monitor rain barrel use,” deputy state engineer Kevin Rein said.last_img read more

10 months agoBrighton boss Hughton finds positives from Chelsea defeat

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Brighton boss Hughton finds positives from Chelsea defeatby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBrighton boss Chris Hughton drew positives from defeat at home to Chelsea.Solly March pulled a goal back for the Seagulls after first-half strikes from Pedro and Eden Hazard, and Hughton decided to focus on his team’s second-half reaction, as they created chances to equalise against the Blues.He said, “We have to take the positives from how we finished the game. We were up against a very good side — whether it was at home or away, they’ve spent big money and brought in exceptional players.“They’re a team that will be pushing at the top end of the division, so we have to understand that and respect that.“But I thought we were in the game for large periods, and that’s what you want. I can’t fault the effort our players put in, particularly in the second half.“We said ‘if you can get that first goal back, anything can happen’. If one of those scrambles in the last few minutes goes in, then it’s a different outcome.” last_img read more

Former Shark Tank contestant hit with drug charge

first_imgFREEHOLD, N.J. – A former contestant on ABC’s “Shark Tank” is facing charges that he belonged to a New Jersey cocaine-distribution ring.John DePaola was among nine defendants arrested Sunday. The Monmouth County prosecutor said Monday that the group distributed cocaine in the Freehold area.DePaola is charged with conspiracy to possess cocaine. His lawyer, Herbert Ellis, calls the charge “baffling” and “without merit.” He says that DePaola is not a “druggie” or a drug dealer.The 53-year-old Jackson resident appeared on a 2014 episode of “Shark Tank.” His company, which sells paint brush covers, attracted a $200,000 investment from “Shark Tank” personality Lori Greiner.DePaola and his business partners said in a follow-up segment that their product landed in 14,000 stores nationwide, with $1.5 million in sales.last_img read more

Hudsons Bay Co says Saks Fifth Avenue stores affected by data breach

first_imgTORONTO – Hudson’s Bay Co. is the latest Canadian company to be hit with a data breach, saying that customer payment card information may have been stolen from shoppers at certain Saks Fifth Avenue, Saks Off Fifth and Lord & Taylor stores in North America.A spokesperson for retailer would not comment on whether any specific Canadian locations were affected, but did say there is no indication the breach affects any of HBC’s other digital platforms, Hudson’s Bay stores or Home Outfitters locations.HBC released little information on the breach itself on Sunday, but a New York-based cybersecurity firm said it had analyzed the available data and found that information from five-million credit cards had been compromised.Gemini Advisory LLC said in a report that the information was stolen from 83 Saks Fifth Avenue or Saks Off Fifth stores, and from all Lord & Taylor locations.The firm found that three Canadian Saks locations were exposed to the breach: Sherway Gardens in Toronto, Bramalea City Centre in Brampton, Ont. and Pickering Town Centre in Pickering, Ont.Dmitry Chorine, the co-founder of Gemini Advisory, said his firm works to improve response to data breaches by analyzing stolen data that appears on the so-called dark web.Chorine said the firm started looking into the breach when they noticed an influx of stolen credit and debit card information being offered for sale on the dark web last week.Upon analyzing the data, Chorine said they were able to determine that shoppers at all Lord & Taylor and at certain Saks Fifth Avenue locations were at risk of having their information stolen.“On March 28, we saw a significant spike of stolen credit cards offered for sale on one of the marketplaces,” said Chorine.“When we checked, we saw there was an advertisement stating that more than five-million credit and debit cards will be offered for sale, and that’s when we decided to research this particular breach.”The data that Chorine and his team found was being offered on a dark web marketplace operated by a hacking group called JokerStash, which Chorine says has been active in hacking retail and hospitality companies for the past three years.Gemini Advisory said Sunday that it had found data that had been stolen from as early as March 2017, and as late as March 2018.He said that only certain Saks Fifth Avenue locations were affected because the outlet was in the process of switching from card-swipe technology to EMV chip technology, which is already commonly used in Canada.Stores that had already implemented chip machines would likely not be exposed to the data breach, Chorine said.Chorine urged any consumers who had shopped at Saks Fifth Avenue or Lord & Taylor stores in the past year to take preventative measures against fraud.“They should probably call their banks and replace their cards,” said Chorine. “That would probably be the best preventative action they could take, instead of just waiting.”For now, HBC is asking clients to review their account statements for activity or transactions they don’t recognize.The company said it’s investigating and taking steps to contain the attack, and clients will not be responsible for any fraudulent charges as a result of the breach.It said it will offer free identity protection services to those affected once they learn more about the breach.last_img read more

DolceGabbana founders make video apology to China

first_imgBEIJING — The founders of Dolce&Gabbana have apologized in a video on Chinese social media after promotional videos seen as racist and subsequent Instagram messages stoked a furor in one of the world’s largest markets for luxury goods.The Italian fashion house has been in hot water for the videos and also insulting remarks made by the Instagram accounts of both the company and co-founder Stefano Gabbana. It blamed hackers.Gabbana and Domenico Dolce appeared in a video posted Friday on Chinese social media saying they hope to be forgiven and will do their best to better understand and respect Chinese culture. They finish by saying “sorry” in Chinese.The videos and the Instagram comments created a huge backlash in China, forcing Dolce&Gabbana to cancel a major show this week.The Associated Presslast_img read more

Its Time To Stop Pretending That The NFL Preseason Isnt Pointless

If the coaches, players and fans all feel like the risk of injury has outstripped the value of playing the games, there’s no viable path forward for the four-game preseason. Only one question remains: Whether the coaches, players and fans can persuade the owners to get on a different path. For most of the 2000s and into the middle of this decade, the number of starters who threw the fewest preseason passes on their teams stayed in the low single digits. Last year, it was a full half of the league’s starting QBs.This year, no starters have thrown the most passes of anyone else on their team, and 22 threw the fewest. In just seven years, we’ve gone from almost half the league mostly playing their starters to over two-thirds the league barely playing them at all.There’s also reason to believe that the decline of starting QB reps across the league this preseason is not a coincidence. The NFL and its players’ union have begun negotiations for their next collective bargaining agreement, and truncating the preseason is reportedly a major negotiating topic. In that context, coaches and players are incentivized to force the owners’ hands.Last week, with Luck likely to sit out the third preseason game, Colts head coach Frank Reich and Chicago Bears head coach Matt Nagy texted before the game and reached a mutual I-won’t-play-my-guys-if-you-won’t truce. A similar detente was reached between Philadelphia Eagles head coach Doug Pederson and Baltimore Ravens skipper John Harbaugh after their week of joint practices.In fact, joint practice sessions seem to be where the starters are getting all the reps they’ve been giving up.“I think [joint practices are] the trend. I think that’s where we’re going. I think that’s the way the league is heading,” Pederson said in a recent press conference. “As coaches, we get to set the situation and control the environment, and sometimes you don’t get those in games. You don’t get that situation in a game, and this way we can control that and work on specific things and get some really good work done with our starters.”That all makes sense: If a coach really wants to work on the two-minute offense, a preseason game offers no guarantee that a team will even get in a two-minute situation. The same is true for any other situation, matchup or personnel package. What doesn’t make sense, though, is charging fans full price to watch an uncontrolled scrimmage between a bunch of players who likely won’t even make their respective teams.On Monday, Texans head coach Bill O’Brien suggested that fans could whet their appetite for starter-on-starter action by the league televising joint practices in lieu of two preseason games: This season, it fell even more steeply. Projected Week 1 starters (via OurLads) accounted for just 11.7 percent of pass attempts.1Luck was the Colts’ projected starter up to and through the start of the Colts’ third preseason game, so he counts as “the starter” in these numbers. That’s a 43 percent drop in one year, after more than a decade of consistently giving fans at least a decent look at the most important player on the team.The same pattern shows up when we look at how many starters have led their team in preseason attempts — and how many starters have brought up the rear. In 2002, 14 of 32 teams’ starting quarterbacks led their team in preseason pass attempts, and in 2012, 13 starters still led their team in preseason throws. But since 2015, no more than three have. The curtain fell on the 2019 NFL preseason Thursday night — and judging by the volleys of rotten produce hurled at it by fans, writers and coaches, the NFL may never want to stage that show the same way again.For decades, it’s felt like the NFL has had a predictable rhythm to how (and how often) starters play. A little in the first game, then a little more, and then the third preseason game is the “dress rehearsal,” when coaches game-plan, starters start, and the fans who paid full price for tickets get treated to something resembling their team. In the context of meaningless August football, this one game on the preseason schedule was the closest thing fans got to the real thing. The fourth preseason game, in which starters rarely played, has been a forgivable afterthought.But the ugly, pointless football played Thursday night felt unforgivable — because the players fans pay to see barely played in the first three games, either. Even the last bastion of NFL preseason relevance seems to be vanishing. This year’s “dress rehearsals” hardly lived up to their billing. Carolina Panthers starting quarterback Cam Newton left the game after a minor injury. Almost all of the Green Bay Packers’ starters were held out. Houston starter Deshaun Watson got sacked to start the team’s first possession, the Texans lost starting running back Lamar Miller for the season on the next play, then Watson got sacked again, fumbled the ball and headed for the bench without throwing a pass. Indianapolis Colts starter Andrew Luck retired before taking a single preseason rep.If teams are comfortable going the entire preseason with their starting quarterbacks barely taking the field, the league’s case for making their fans spend the time and money to watch these games is significantly weakened. Perhaps as no surprise, calls to reduce the number of preseason games are now coming from everywhere, from fans on Twitter to major news outlets. It feels like all of a sudden, the whole NFL-watching world has given up on the preseason.Of course, calls for a shortened NFL preseason are nothing new. Analyst John Clayton called for it in The Washington Post earlier this month — almost two decades after he wrote for ESPN that players’ union representatives had already been pushing for it “for years.”The year after Clayton wrote that ESPN article, the NFL expanded to 32 teams. Fourteen of those teams’ eventual Week 1 starters led their squad in preseason pass attempts. Even as their union reps were arguing that a four-game preseason was at least one game more than anybody needed, stars like Tom Brady, Drew Brees, Daunte Culpepper, Brett Favre and Peyton Manning were out there taking more reps than anybody on their team.During that 2002 season, 34.4 percent of preseason passes were thrown by quarterbacks who would go on to start Week 1. A decade later, starters’ share of the workload was about the same. But from 2012 to last season, their leaguewide share of pass attempts dropped by 36.5 percent. read more

Big Ten coaches welcome Cornhuskers to conference

The newest team in the Big Ten football conference, Nebraska, was welcomed with open arms at Big Ten Media Days, where several coaches said they have already seen a positive impact because of the new addition. Wisconsin’s head coach Bret Bielema, whose team opens conference play against the Cornhuskers, said he has already noticed Nebraska’s direct influence on recruiting. “When (Big Ten Commissioner) Jim Delany made the decision to bring Nebraska into our league, bring that name and program, I’ve noticed it overall,” Bielema said. “I’ve noticed it in recruiting. “I can’t tell you how many times I’ve had parents or recruits sitting in my office talking about the Big Ten Network and the exposure that it brings, to bring Nebraska in, and for us to be a part of the Leaders Division for the first time in college football history…” Penn State’s head coach Joe Paterno said that while he was at one point an outspoken advocate for adding an eastern team to the conference, he feels “extremely good” about the Cornhuskers’ selection. They will bring an added toughness to the conference, he said at Big Ten Media Days, which took place last Thursday and Friday in Chicago. “When we got Nebraska, that was a real coup. It’s going to make the league tougher,” Paterno said. “The tougher the other guy is, the better you get, if you’re a competitor.” For Michigan State coach Mark Dantonio, the move is a positive not just for individual teams but for the conference as a whole. “With Nebraska coming into the conference, I think it gives us, the conference as a whole, strengthens our brand,” Dantonio said. Kirk Ferentz, the head coach at Iowa, was especially excited about the possibility of a new rivalry due to Iowa and Nebraska’s shared border. “It’s certainly, I think, something that is going to be something very much of interest for the fans,” Ferentz said. “I remember coming to Iowa in 1981, there were probably more Nebraska fans than Iowa fans. Hopefully that’s changed a little bit, but time will tell.” In hopes of spurring the rivalry, the Cornhuskers and the Hawkeyes announced at Media Days that they will play in the conference’s newest trophy game, the Heroes Game. The game, which will be played on the last Friday in November this year, will honor one hero from Iowa and one from Nebraska. Despite other coaches’ enthusiasm, no coach was more excited than the Cornhuskers’ coach, Bo Pelini, who said he thinks Nebraska is a good fit for the Big Ten. “I think if you look at the tradition, academic integrity, all the things that I believe our program at the University of Nebraska stands for, I think we fit right in with this conference,” Pelini said. “Tremendous football, tremendous athletics, a tremendous commitment to academics, and doing things the right way. That’s what this conference is all about.” Pelini said facing all new opponents will require more time and preparation from his team in order to be a strong competitor. “We basically had 11 new opponents on our schedule which creates a little bit of a challenge for our football team and our kids,” Pelini said. Still, he said he has no plans to drastically alter his style of play. “We’re going to do what we do and we’re going to do it well,” he said. “We’re not really going to adapt what we do to the conference. We’re going to hopefully make the conference adapt to what we do.”  OSU will face the Cornhuskers this season in Lincoln, Neb., on Oct. 8. read more

Ohio State football seniors legacy up for debate

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — You could use three words to describe the now-departed Ohio State football senior class: good, bad and ugly. For several Buckeye seniors, whose legacy to OSU football might be in question, Monday’s season-ending 24-17 loss to Florida in the 2012 Gator Bowl, was an opportunity to reflect on the highs, the lows and the forgettable moments of their OSU careers. Several players, including senior center Michael Brewster, pointed to back-to-back Bowl Championship Series victories in the 2010 Rose Bowl and the 2011 Sugar Bowl as a reminder of the class’ accomplishments. “We had a good run in the middle — two BCS bowl wins, three Big Ten championships,” Brewster said. “There were a lot of what ifs about this year — what could have been. But we won a Sugar Bowl and a Rose bowl back-to-back. I think that’s something that’s pretty amazing.” The 2011 Sugar Bowl victory to which Brewster referred — a 31-26 win against Arkansas — was later vacated by the university, along with the entire 2010 regular season, for NCAA rules violations. To be sure, OSU football’s class of 2011 enjoyed bowl triumphs, or “good” moments. Then the 2011 season began — a season some members of Buckeye Nation might consider a low moment in the program’s history. OSU lost seven games for the first time since 1897. The campaign fraught with turbulence on and off the playing field for each team member, but especially the members of the class of 2011. The season-ending defeat to Florida elicited different reactions from the departing Buckeyes and their teammates that remain. Off-field transgressions — many of which were committed by OSU seniors — resulted in penalties for OSU football. On Dec. 19, the NCAA Committee on Infractions handed the team a one-year postseason ban and slashed a total of nine scholarships over three years due to multiple violations. In December 2010, five OSU football players, former quarterback Terrelle Pryor, senior wide receiver DeVier Posey, senior left tackle Mike Adams, senior running back Daniel “Boom” Herron and redshirt senior defensive end Solomon Thomas, were suspended for the first five games of the 2011 season after selling Buckeye football memorabilia in exchange for improper benefits in the form of tattoos. Redshirt sophomore linebacker Jordan Whiting also received a one-game ban. Posey, who was suspended for a total of 10 games for two separate NCAA violations, said there weren’t many on-field positives for him to draw from in 2011. “It’s definitely not wins, and it’s not like a good football season as far as things go,” Posey said. “This was definitely a humbling experience.” Not all OSU seniors’ careers were marred by controversy though. Redshirt senior linebacker Tyler Moeller removed his scarlet and gray jersey for the final time Monday. The game brought about an end to Moeller’s six-year career at Ohio Stadium, which saw the player battle back from injuries and an assault and subsequent brain trauma. “It’s sad and disappointing at the same time,” Moeller said of leaving the Buckeyes. “Having your last game to take it (your jersey) off be a loss, it’s tough. It’s been a great journey. Ending with a loss is just tough.” After Monday’s loss, senior linebacker Andrew Sweat talked about the pride he takes in having been a part of OSU football, saying the experience was “surreal.” “You get to here and you’re so excited to play for a prestigious program like Ohio State,” Sweat said. “You experience all the highs that we’ve experienced, and obviously this season was full of lows. But that only makes you better as a person. Players like Moeller and Sweat might be cause for former coach and now-assistant defensive coordinator Luke Fickell’s affinity for the departing seniors. “What we think of their legacy and what you write about their legacy is two completely different things,” Fickell said. “For us, we know that they’ve fought through and battled a lot of things. We know what they mean to us, and how we feel about them.” read more