Govt putting ‘cart before the horse’ – Nandlall

first_imgGovernment’s proposed plan to establish a law school here has been questioned since there are concerns over whether the process being used is the right one, and if on establishing this school, Guyanese will have a recognised qualification to practise law throughout the Caribbean.Former Attorney General and Legal Affairs Minister Anil Nandlall said the issue was a straightforward one that has been made ambiguous, complex and confusing by the alleged lies being peddled by his successor, Basil Williams, who has, in fact, given several different statements regarding the same issue.One major concern for Nandlall is the move taken by Williams to proceed to sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with what he described as two unrecognised institutions.The former AG told Guyana Times that he believes Williams also misrepresented to Cabinet that he obtained permission from the Council of Legal Education (CLE) to establish a law school in Guyana.“I believe that he didn’t even know that he had to have permission from CLE. When I pointed that out to him through the press publicly, he said yes. That’s the first lie he told. Now to cover up that lie, he has been lying consistently and persistently ever since,” Nandlall opined.In fact, the CLE did indicate that Guyana was not granted permission although the Attorney General declared several times that Guyana did obtain permission in 2017.Nandlall said this was a clear case of Government putting the “cart before the horse”.Williams has attacked CLE Chairman Reginald Armour, claiming that he (Armour) responded to a request from Nandlall to have the matter of Guyana establishing a law school put on the CLE agenda.In his defence, Nandlall said he did write the CLE Chairman questioning him whether he was aware that Guyana was establishing a law school. The former Minister also sought to find out whether permission was granted and whether the CLE had in fact authorised Guyana to establish such a law school.“The CLE responded to me and said we are surprised as you are, because we haven’t given any permission. And we (CLE) are the regulatory body in relation to setting up law schools,” Nandlall told this publication, explaining that is how the matter was discussed at the CLE meeting.The former Minister said it was not his intention to block any development that Government may seek but to ensure that if a law school was established here, students would be able to get a recognised qualification.He said, “I suppose the feasibility study will answer a few questions in relation to whether there is a need for such a school, what is the extent and nature of the need that will determine the capacity… or whether there is need for a law school, the programmes and qualifications,” he added.Nandlall maintains that if Government is going about establishing a law school, then it should be done in stages.While the AG has named Guyana’s committee for the setting-up of the law school, he said he was not yet ready to inform the CLE.Government announced in January 2017 it would start a project to establish the JOF Haynes Law School of the Americas. This school is being established through a public-private partnership entered into between the Government of Guyana, the Law School of the Americas (LCA) and the University College of the Caribbean (UCC), and will add to the existing options available to holders of a Bachelor of Laws (LLB).last_img read more

Indian Kids Most Common Victims of Cyberbullying, Study Says

first_imgIndian kids are the most common victims of cyberbullying with India holding the record for having the most children falling prey to cyberbullying in 2018.The survey, conducted by UK-based consumer tech review firm Comparitech in 28 countries, ranks India high in the list of countries with 37 percent parents reporting their kids being bullied, which has only increased over the years.“Meanwhile, Indian parents remained among the highest to express confidence that their children were cyberbullied at least sometimes, a number that only grew from 2011 to 2018”, the study says.The survey which was based on 20,793 interviews, conducted between March 23 – April 6, 2018, among adults aged 18-64 in the U.S. and Canada, and adults aged 16-64 in other countries shows that in Russia and Japan, parents expressed extremely high levels of confidence that their children did not experience any kind of cyberbullying.After India, other countries that reported a higher number of cyberbullying are Brazil, the U.S., Belgium, and South Africa.Referring to the growing span of the internet, the study says “the “faceless evil” of the internet is a growing threat for teens, specifically when it comes cyberbullying. Despite a more recent ramping up of awareness campaigns, cyberbullying facts and statistics indicate the problem is not going away anytime soon.”According to the Cyberbullying Research Center, which has been collecting data on the subject since 2002, the number of cyberbullying among teens has doubled since 2007, up from just 18 percent. Though a different study conducted by Pew in 2007 suggested 32 percent teens falling victims to cyberbullying, the number has increased slightly.Research presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting revealed the number of children admitted to hospitals for attempted suicide or expressing suicidal thoughts doubled between 2008 and 2015. Much of the rise is linked to an increase in cyberbullying, CNN reported. More teen suicides are also now attributed in some way to cyberbullying than ever before.Among the top sources for cyberbullying, Facebook remains a common platform or through text messages. Further, 34 percent of students claimed to have been bullied online at least once in their lifetime. In a survey of parents and adults across Asia, 79 percent reported that either their child or a child they know had been threatened with physical harm while playing online games.The website Nobullying.com recorded over 9.3 million visits in 2016 from people seeking help with bullying, cyberbullying and online safety. Related Itemslast_img read more