Vote Now in Our Top Adventure College Tournament Presented by ENO

first_img*Remember to vote once every 24 hours!*Round of 32: March 6 – 20Round of 16: March 20 – 27Elite 8: March 27 – April 3Final Four: April 3 – 10Championship: April 10 – 17 For the fifth year running, Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine’s readers are selecting the top Top Outdoor Adventure colleges in the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic. Colleges and universities—selected for their outdoor clubs and curricula, commitment to outdoor and environmental initiatives, quality of outdoor athletes and programs, and opportunities for adventure—meet in head-to-head matchups in a 32-school bracket. In each contest, the school receiving the most votes advances to the next round.Larger Division I schools go head-to-head on one side of the bracket, while smaller schools square off on the other side. The two division winners face off in a David-meets-Goliath championship to determine the region’s best outdoor school.A special thank you to ENO for their partnership and support for the 2017 Top Adventure College contest!SEE IF YOUR FAVORITE SCHOOL MADE THE CUT AND VOTE HERE!last_img read more

Mets Hot Start Adds Juice to Irrelevant Subway Series

first_imgWe’ve made it, folks. Just a couple of weeks into the MLB season and New York’s hype machine (the media) is salivating over the first Subway Series of the season, perhaps the most irrelevant three games both teams will play all year. Still, you get the sense that even the World Series won’t approach the build up this three-game bout has generated. Neither would a Rangers-Islanders matchup in the second round of the Stanley Cup playoffs.Usually the Subway Series comes and goes without a peep—mostly because the Mets have been dreadful recently. And let’s be honest, interleague matchups don’t have the same cache they had when the ridiculous concept was first introduced, making these games feel more like glorified exhibitions than matchups that matter. Instead of expanding interleague play, they should eliminate it entirely, but that’s a story for another day.It’s cool, I guess, to watch both teams battle for bragging rights. In the grand scheme of things, the six games (the final series is in September) the Mets and Yankees will play against one another won’t matter as much as bitter divisional battles. Even Mets fans would admit that key games against division foes Washington Nationals would be a better indicator of the team’s makeup.Who cares if the Mets sweep the Yankees or vice versa? In the spirit of full disclosure, I’m a Yankees fan. But I’ve never overly celebrated a Yanks win over the Amazins. Nor have I gloated afterward. I never saw the point. A win is a win. The only time I jumped for joy was when Bernie Williams caught the final out of the 2000 World Series.I don’t mean to be a buzz kill, but just calling it like it is. View image | gettyimages.com I will concede that the fact that the Mets come in winning 11 consecutive games (10 in a row at home) and hold the best record in baseball adds much-needed excitement to a previously ho-hum series that produced very little drama. Also, the Yanks come home winning six of their last seven, including taking a four-game series from the talented Detroit Tigers, considered the class of the American League.Both teams arrive at Yankee Stadium on considerable hot streaks and having Matt Harvey (the Dark Knight, as Mets fans call him) pitch against the hated Yanks is no doubt a must-see event. Harvey’s presence is indeed huge but there’s more to the Mets than just his all-star persona: They’re a gritty bunch that hasn’t wilted under the pressure of a barrage of injuries. Despite losing David Wright, the Mets have developed a “next man up” mentality that leads you to believe they can sustain their winning ways throughout the long season.The Yanks, on the other hand, don’t offer much in the way of day-to-do star power, other than their disgraced DH/third baseman Alex Rodriguez, who has slugged his way back into the good graces of plenty of Yankees fans. With the “Core Four” gone and most other “stars” on the team aging, it’s pretty difficult to grow attached to this roster. Mets fans don’t have that problem, given their dearth of homegrown assets.Maybe that explains the hysteria going into this match up, the up-and-coming Mets taking on a Yankees team that resembles a senior living center, not an invigorating baseball team. Everyone wants to see if the Mets will descend on Yankee Stadium and reclaim the city. If the Yankees end up winning the series, will that diminish anything the Mets have done this early season? Absolutely not.It’s just another series, albeit a juicy one. But wouldn’t it be juicer if interleague play didn’t exist and these two teams met in the World Series? Now, that’d be a reason to go hysterical.center_img Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York last_img read more

Biden announces COVID-19 advisory board as Pfizer announces promising early vaccine data

first_imgThe board also includes Dr. Luciana Borio, who was until 2019 director for medical and biodefense preparedness on Trump’s National Security Council; Dr. Rick Bright, the former head of the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority who became a whistleblower over the Trump administration’s handling of the pandemic; Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel, of the University of Pennsylvania; Dr. Atul Gawande, of Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital; University of Minnesota Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy director Dr. Michael Osterholm; University of California at San Francisco School of Medicine professor Dr. Eric Goosby, who was global AIDS coordinator under President Barack Obama; Dr. Celine Gounder, of New York University’s Grossman School of Medicine; Robert Wood Johnson Foundation executive vice president Dr. Julie Morita; the Global Health Council’s Dr. Loyce Pace; and Dr. Robert Rodriguez, another UCSF School of Medicine professor.Biden is, as promised, taking the coronavirus pandemic seriously and putting together a group of scientists to advise him. Unfortunately, Team Trump can be expected to stay in Biden’s way as he tries to prepare a robust public health response to the pandemic while Trump himself has a sustained temper tantrum over losing. Mike Pence tried to take a victory lap, claiming credit for the vaccine news—but “We were never part of the Warp Speed,” Pfizer’s head of vaccine research had already said on the record. “We have never taken any money from the U.S. government, or from anyone.”The advisory board Biden announced is co-chaired by former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy, former FDA Commissioner David Kessler, and Marcella Nunez-Smith, associate dean for health equity research at the Yale School of Medicine. Nunez-Smith is an especially significant choice, since she studies discrimination in the healthcare system, an important topic in a pandemic that has hit Black and Latino communities so hard.”Dealing with the coronavirus pandemic is one of the most important battles our administration will face, and I will be informed by science and by experts,” Biden said in a statement. “The advisory board will help shape my approach to managing the surge in reported infections; ensuring vaccines are safe, effective, and distributed efficiently, equitably, and free; and protecting at-risk populations.”- Advertisement – – Advertisement –center_img At one time or another, Biden’s COVID-19 team will have to administer vaccine distribution. The Pfizer news suggests it may be sooner rather than later and that Biden may be inheriting a process Donald Trump has already messed up. “I congratulate the brilliant women and men who helped produce this breakthrough and to give us such cause for hope,” Biden said in a statement responding to the Pfizer news. But he also warned that “the end of the battle against COVID-19 is many months away,” because even if the timeline stays in place, “it will be many more months before there is widespread vaccination in this country.” For that reason, Biden again emphasized the importance of continuing to wear masks and practice social distancing.- Advertisement –last_img read more

Indonesian start-up to make COVID-19 test kits

first_imgAn Indonesia-based start-up, Nusantics, is reportedly preparing to make 100,000 COVID-19 test kits. A prototype will be complete within three weeks, an investor says.Willson Cuaca, co-founder and managing partner at East Venture, said Nusantics had been appointed by the Agency for the Assessment and Application of Technology (BPPT) to make the test kits based on samples from Indonesian nationals.East Venture, the most active early-stage venture capital firm in Indonesia, provided an undisclosed amount of seed money to the start-up on March 20 to support production. “Nusantics will create the test kits based on samples from Indonesia because the virus can mutate when it finds a new host,” Willson told The Jakarta Post over the phone.Read also: As contagion spreads, Indonesia focuses COVID-19 tests in three worst-hit provincesWillson added that 1,000 prototypes were expected to be finished in two weeks and would then be tested on patients. Once the kits were proven successful, the first 20,000 kits would be distributed within a month.“Right now, it is difficult to get tested for the coronavirus as it keeps spreading throughout the nation,” Willson said. “That is why we want to help the start-up achieve this goal.” East Ventures will lead crowdfunding with a target of Rp 10 billion (US$ 620,155) to produce the test kits and finance the whole genome sequencing project. The public can join by accessing indonesiapastibisa.com to donate money or equipment starting March 30.Nusantics is a technology company established in 2019 that focuses on applying advancements in genomics and microbiome research. Microbiomes are complex ecosystems of microorganisms, such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi, that live on and inside every living thing.“The technology that Nusantics uses in skin microbiome analysis is similar to technology used to detect COVID-19 and our team also has the experience in medical test kits and bioinformatics,” said Nusantics CEO Sharlini Eriza Putri in a written statement on Friday.In addition to Nusantics, East Ventures’ known investments range from e-commerce platform Tokopedia and online travel agent Traveloka, to wedding organizing platform Bride Story and media platforms Kata Data and Tech in Asia.Editor’s note: This article has been updated to include a statement from Nusantics and details on crowdfunding plans.Topics :last_img read more

Swedish pensions body calls for smaller-scale EU stress tests for IORPs

first_img“I’m rather afraid the people who want the stress tests conducted would like to test as many angles as possible and are not taking into account the additional costs that in the end pensioners have to bear,” Hansson said.Although he said EU pensions oversight was necessary, he said the new IORP law could not be the same for the whole of Europe because pensions in each EU member state were based on local social law.“If you had an IORP law that was the same for all of Europe, that would be a problem because there are so many different conditions in different areas,” he said.“Pensions are member-based contracts based on labour law, negotiated by employers and unions, and they are different across Europe.”Last week, IPE reported that Patrick Darlap, chairman of EIOPA’s Financial Stability Committee, said the European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority was preparing stress tests for IORPs for some time in 2015. Early stress tests for institutions for occupational retirement provision (IORPs) in the EU – now likely to happen next year – must be designed in a limited format in order to keep costs down for pension funds, the Swedish Occupational Pension Fund Association has said.Peter Hansson, chairman of the association (Tjanstepensionsforbundet), told IPE: “If we are to have stress tests, the exercise needs to be very limited, and the cost of producing the stress tests needs to be very low.”He said that, at 170 pages in small print, the stress tests conducted last year were impossible for many IORPs to handle, and the outcomes were hardly representative of the European pension industry.He said it was unreasonable for pension funds, purpose-built to provide workplace pensions, to be burdened with huge additional costs as a result of the tests.last_img read more

Cricketing great Ian Healy sells Brisbane home of nearly 20 years

first_imgThis home at 15 Buena Vista Ave, Coorparoo, has sold. The view from the home at 15 Buena Vista Ave, Coorparoo, which has sold.The home has five bedrooms, two bathrooms, a pool and two-car garage and sits on a large 974 sqm block.The property was sold off market by Steven Gow of Ray White Bulimba, who declined to comment.It was marketed as being located in “one of the best streets on the south side of Brisbane” with “spectacular city views”. COFFEE KING SELLS GOLD COAST APARTMENT More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus17 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market17 hours ago The front of the home at 15 Buena Vista Ave, Coorparoo.The property offered the potential to renovate, rebuild or sub divide subject to council approval.Records show the property last sold for $685,000 in June 1999.Coorparoo is a high demand suburb 5km from Brisbane’s CBD and has a median house price of $875,000, according to property researcher CoreLogic. NO DELUSIONS OF GRANDEUR HERE Former Australian Test cricket wicketkeeper Ian Healy. Picture: Nigel Hallett.AUSSIE cricketing great Ian Healy has sold his Brisbane home of nearly 20 years for $2.215 million.The former Test cricket wicketkeeper has lived in the house at 15 Buena Vista Ave, Coorparoo, with his wife, Helen, and their three children for nearly two decades. GET THE LATEST REAL ESTATE NEWS DIRECT TO YOUR INBOX HERE Ian Healy dives low to claim a catch off skipper Hansie Cronje during the Australia vs. South Africa Third Test match at Adelaide Oval in 1994. Picture: Leigh Winburn.Brisbane born and bred, Ian Healy was considered one of the greatest wicketkeepers to have graced the game during the 1980s and 1990s.Post retirement, he became a television sports presenter and commentator. Healy now owns the Hoppy’s car wash business, which has 10 sites in southeast Queensland.last_img read more

Aussies more property geeks than fitness freaks: HSBC study

first_imgA new study reveals Aussies spend twice as much time looking at property than at the gym.THE housing market might be cooling, but it seems Australia’s obsession with property is hotter than ever.New research from HSBC reveals Aussies spend twice as much time looking at buying property than they do at the gym — even if they are not in the market for a new home.The global study found we clock up 2.5 hours a week researching the property market, compared to the 1.08 hours we spend at the gym or talking to our parents (0.88 hours). RELATED: Property taxes hit record levels Why the worst of the downturn could be over “An industry of property magazines, TV programs and websites is making it harder than ever to have realistic expectations about what you can afford — with many Aussies putting off important life stages, like having children, in the quest to afford the perfect property.“It’s essential to begin this buying process by having an open discussion with your partner, family or financial adviser to discuss what you can afford and what compromises you might have to make.” THE COUNTRIES MOST OBSESSED WITH THE PROPERTY MARKETCountry Hours spent on property research (per week)UAE 6.6USA 4.95Taiwan 4.54Mexico 3.56Singapore 3.29UK 2.65Australia 2.51Canada 2.08France 1.74(Source: HSBC) A new study has found extreme house hunters spend more than 7 hours a week looking at property. Image: AAP/Lukas Coch.Difficult neighbours is our biggest deal breaker (46 per cent) when it comes to a property purchase — something Aussies have in common with French and British buyers.Rumours of a property being haunted are enough to put off 21 per cent of Australian buyers.HSBC Australia head of mortgages Alice Del Vecchio said the study showed softening property prices and low interest rates were encouraging factors for people looking to get in to the local housing market.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus13 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market13 hours ago MORE: Turning failure into success A new survey has found Aussies spend twice as much time researching property as they do at the gym.Extreme house hunters spend more than seven hours every week window shopping for homes, reading property magazines and trawling online listings.The survey also found 23 per cent of Aussies check their home’s value every three months.But Aussies are far from the most obsessed nation when it comes to property.The UAE and USA take that crown, spending an average of 6.6 and 4.95 hours, respectively, on property each week. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:04Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:04 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p288p288p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenTips to keep ahead of the property market01:05 HSBC has undertaken a global survey to find out the most property obsessed countries in the world. Photo: AFP/Isaac Lawrence.“Buying a property is often the most significant purchase Aussies make, but it seems that some home buyers are taking their passion for the perfect home to the extreme,” Ms Del Vecchio said. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:01Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:01 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p270p270p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenAndrew Winter: How to buy the right apartment01:01 Australia’s worst place to own a homelast_img read more

Bed sharing with toddler – no harm, no benefit for kids over 1

first_img Share Share HealthLifestyle Bed sharing with toddler – no harm, no benefit for kids over 1 by: – July 18, 2011 10 Views   no discussions Sharecenter_img Sharing is caring! Tweet Is it harmful to your child’s development to have your toddler sleep with you?  Experts can’t seem to agree on whether it’s a good thing or bad but a new study finds that it may not be harmful to children  as long as the child is at least a year old.It’s called bed-sharing, where parents and a child sleep in the same bed.  It’s not as common in the United States as in other countries, but it’s more prevalent among certain ethnic groups.According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, it’s not advised for parents to ever sleep with infants before the age of 6 months.  That’s the time when babies are most at risk for sudden infant death syndrome.   But the study authors and the AAP agree that once a child is 12 months old , co-sleeping or bed-sharing with parents is really up to the preference of the family.  However, the goal for any sleep arrangement is to get safe, adequate sleep.  If bed-sharing is getting in the way of a good night’s sleep or is dangerous in any way for your child, then it’s not a good idea.The study authors set out to find out whether toddlers  who slept with their parents would have social or developmental issues by the time they reached kindergarten.  The researchers interviewed 944 low-income families and looked at whether  children between the ages of 1 and 3 slept in the same bed as their parents.  The experts found no signs that children who shared a bed with their parents had developmental problems at age 5.  The study was published in the journal Pediatrics on Monday.“When you compare mothers of the same ethnicity and the same levels of education, whether they bed-share or not, does not predict a difference in cognitive or behavioral outcomes in their children,” explains study author Lauren Hale, Ph.D., associate professor of preventive medicine at Stony Brook University in Stony Brook, New York.Hale and other researchers measured math, early literacy and social skills in the children. They even looked at levels of hyperactivity and found no cognitive or social differences between children who bed-shared and those who did not.“There are a number of reasons why parents decide to share a bed with their children such as safety, security, to facilitate breast-feeding,  in response to sleeping problems, to provide emotional support, living conditions, etc.  Understanding those reasons can provide clues to the outcomes of bed-sharing on children’s later behavior and cognition,” Dr. Lynne Haverkos with the National Institutes of Health, the organization that funded the study.Experts agree that what’s most important, is that everybody gets a good night’s sleep.  For some families bed-sharing disrupts both the parents’ and the child’s sleep. For others it works well.“If a family is going to bed-share, both parents must agree to it,”  explains Brett Kuhn, associate professor of pediatrics and psychology at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha.  “Make sure it’s planned and intentional and that you do it from the beginning of the night to the end of the night.  You’re not going to play musical beds when the child fusses.”Bringing a child into your bed to stop repeated episodes of crying may not only interrupt parental sleep but  interfere in the child’s ability to soothe himself to sleep.Haverkos says more studies are needed to look more closely at the risks and benefits of bed-sharing, but that the best bet is to discuss the issue with your pediatrician or health care provider.  What qualifies as a safe and satisfying sleep arrangement for one family may not be the same for another.CNN Health Newslast_img read more

Arsenal eye RB Leipzig’s Upamecano as Arteta’s first signing

first_img FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Arsenal boss Mikel Arteta is set to receive some significant financial backing in the January transfer window. The Gunners are currently in the midst of their worst ever Premier League season and injuries have taken their toll on the squad. Centre-back Calum Chambers was the latest to suffer in the 2-1 defeat at home to Chelsea on Sunday, with the Englishman set for a prolonged spell on the sidelines with a knee injury. But there could be a ray of hope for Gunners fans, because the board are prepared to set aside funds to bring in a new defender next month. And according to the Daily Mail, Arsenal are lining up RB Leipzig’s Dayot Upamencano as their first acquisition of the winter. The 21-year-old Frenchman is high on Arteta’s wish list and he would cost around £40m – which in the current market isn’t bad going for one of the world’s leading defensive prospects.Advertisement Loading… Upamecano got his big breakthrough at Leipzig’s sister team, RB Salzburg, in 2016 and has since become a mainstay in the Bundesliga side’s back-line under Julian Nagelsmann.center_img Read Also:Drogba responds to Abraham’s goal celebration against Arsenal A powerful centre-back with the ability to play the ball out from the back with ease, he looks the perfect player to slot into Arteta’s new high-energy system at Arsenal. And with just 18 months remaining on his contract at Leipzig, the German outfit would surely be inclined to sell to ensure they receive a healthy transfer fee for such a coveted player. Promoted ContentWho Earns More Than Ronaldo?The Funniest Prankster Grandma And Her Grandson9 Talented Actors Who Are Only Associated With One RolePlaying Games For Hours Can Do This To Your Body10 Phones That Can Work For Weeks Without Recharging6 Incredibly Strange Facts About HurricanesEverything You Need To Know About Asteroid ArmageddonSome Impressive And Almost Shocking Robots That Exist8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its Growth7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend BetterWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?Contemplate Life At These 10 Stargazing Locationslast_img read more

US Sen. Leahy on PH ban: Everyone can express opinions freely

first_imgOn Friday, President Duterte ordered theBureau of Immigration to deny Philippine entry to Leahy and Durbin after theysought to ban Filipino officials involved in what they called the“wrongful imprisonment” of De Lima, a staunch administration critic. MANILA – United States Sen. PatrickLeahy has slammed President Rodrigo Duterte’s order to ban him and fellowsenator Richard Durbin from entering the Philippines. Should the US push through with the banon Filipino officials over De Lima’s case, Panelo added Americans planning tovisit the Philippines would be required to secure a visa. Carle added the illegal drug tradecharges that were filed against opposition Sen. Leila de Lima are “politicallymotivated.” Senator Patrick Leahy De Lima is currently in detention aftershe was charged with drug offenses in 2017 for the proliferation of illegaldrug trade inside the New Bilibid Prison in Muntinlupa City during her time asJustice secretary.center_img “The President is immediately orderingthe Bureau of Immigration to deny US Senators Dick Durbin and Patrick Leahy,the imperious, uninformed and gullible American legislators who introduced thesubject provision in the US 2020 Budget, entry to the Philippines,” said Duterte’sspokesman Salvador Panelo. In a statement by Leahy’s spokespersonDavid Carle, he said that everyone has the right to freely express opinionseven if it is critical to the Duterte administration. “This is about the right of Filipinocitizens – and people everywhere – to freely express their opinions, includingopinions that may be critical of government policies that involve the use ofexcessive force and the denial of due process,” Carle said. “We will not sit idly if they continue tointerfere with our processes as a sovereign state,” Panelo said./PNlast_img read more