Third Sector Digital Conference June 2011 300×250

first_imgThird Sector Digital Conference June 2011 300×250 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 27 April 2011 | News  12 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Italy

first_img News News RSF_en Ten RSF recommendations for the European Union RSF and 60 other organisations call for an EU anti-SLAPP directive After the 11 September attacks, government efforts to reform the country’s intelligence services and fight cybercrime led to a substantial increase in monitoring of the Internet.The government pushed through parliament at the end of 2001 a reform of the national intelligence services, which allowed the civil (SISDE) and military (SISMI) secret services, as well as the carabinieri and the regular police, to install phone and electronic taps simply with permission from the state prosecutor. The inherent secrecy of these special services hides the exact nature of the surveillance, but privacy and confidentiality protection organisations have strongly criticised the measure.Italy, which held the presidency of the informal G8 group of countries at the time of the 11 September attacks, also laid the first stone, in a government statement on 19 September 2001, of a policy of “fighting Internet and high tech crimes.” This led to strengthening the powers, resources and activities of the G8 group.Experts at the June 2002 G8 meeting in Canada of eight heads of government said the G8 network of originally 16 (now 26) countries enables speedy cooperation between international police forces when urgent response is required to high tech crimes, including e-mail messages between terrorists and other criminals. The G8 meeting noted that legal experts and police had developed ways to detect the origin, destination and routing of terrorist and criminal messages on the Internet, ways to get electronic proof of it and to ensure retention of such evidence so that it was not deleted or altered.Internet freedom organisations have especially protested about the controversial amendment of the European Directive on Protection of Telecommunications Data and Information (see section on the European institutions) approved on 30 May 2002 and authorising member-states to retain phone and Internet connection records (traffic logs).LINKS: News ItalyEurope – Central Asia Receive email alerts On eve of the G20 Riyadh summit, RSF calls for public support to secure the release of jailed journalists in Saudi Arabia Organisation to go further ItalyEurope – Central Asia Follow the news on Italy December 2, 2020 Find out more Help by sharing this information June 19, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Italy November 23, 2020 Find out more News – Association for Interactive Electronic Communication Freedom Electronic Frontier Italy (ALCEI-EFI) November 19, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

Aussies more property geeks than fitness freaks: HSBC study

first_imgA new study reveals Aussies spend twice as much time looking at property than at the gym.THE housing market might be cooling, but it seems Australia’s obsession with property is hotter than ever.New research from HSBC reveals Aussies spend twice as much time looking at buying property than they do at the gym — even if they are not in the market for a new home.The global study found we clock up 2.5 hours a week researching the property market, compared to the 1.08 hours we spend at the gym or talking to our parents (0.88 hours). RELATED: Property taxes hit record levels Why the worst of the downturn could be over “An industry of property magazines, TV programs and websites is making it harder than ever to have realistic expectations about what you can afford — with many Aussies putting off important life stages, like having children, in the quest to afford the perfect property.“It’s essential to begin this buying process by having an open discussion with your partner, family or financial adviser to discuss what you can afford and what compromises you might have to make.” THE COUNTRIES MOST OBSESSED WITH THE PROPERTY MARKETCountry Hours spent on property research (per week)UAE 6.6USA 4.95Taiwan 4.54Mexico 3.56Singapore 3.29UK 2.65Australia 2.51Canada 2.08France 1.74(Source: HSBC) A new study has found extreme house hunters spend more than 7 hours a week looking at property. Image: AAP/Lukas Coch.Difficult neighbours is our biggest deal breaker (46 per cent) when it comes to a property purchase — something Aussies have in common with French and British buyers.Rumours of a property being haunted are enough to put off 21 per cent of Australian buyers.HSBC Australia head of mortgages Alice Del Vecchio said the study showed softening property prices and low interest rates were encouraging factors for people looking to get in to the local housing market.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus13 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market13 hours ago MORE: Turning failure into success A new survey has found Aussies spend twice as much time researching property as they do at the gym.Extreme house hunters spend more than seven hours every week window shopping for homes, reading property magazines and trawling online listings.The survey also found 23 per cent of Aussies check their home’s value every three months.But Aussies are far from the most obsessed nation when it comes to property.The UAE and USA take that crown, spending an average of 6.6 and 4.95 hours, respectively, on property each week. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:04Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:04 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p288p288p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenTips to keep ahead of the property market01:05 HSBC has undertaken a global survey to find out the most property obsessed countries in the world. Photo: AFP/Isaac Lawrence.“Buying a property is often the most significant purchase Aussies make, but it seems that some home buyers are taking their passion for the perfect home to the extreme,” Ms Del Vecchio said. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:01Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:01 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p270p270p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenAndrew Winter: How to buy the right apartment01:01 Australia’s worst place to own a homelast_img read more

Calvin sinks Leafs in OT to help Hawks even up Murdoch semi final

first_imgThe Nelson Leafs had the Beaver Valley Nitehawks right where they wanted them.Leading 2-1 in the best-of-seven Murdoch Division Semi Final, the Green and White could take a stranglehold on the series with a home-ice win Tuesday night.However, Dallas Calvin put the Hawks back on even terms scoring a power play marker three minutes into overtime to give Beaver Valley a 4-3 Kootenay International Junior Hockey League playoff victory at the NDCC Arena.The series, tied 2-2, now shifts to Fruitvale for Game five with Game six back in Nelson Friday.“Ya, this feels really good,” said Calvin minutes after cruising into the slot and snapping a shot past a screened Brett Soles in the Leaf nets.“(Nelson) is a very good team but tonight we did a lot of little things right and buried our chances.”The small, but important, parts to the Hawks game allowed the visitors grab a 2-0 lead two minutes into the second period.Dan Holland scored in the last two minutes of the first frame before Derek Lashuk gave the Hawks a two-goal advantage early in the second.The lead stood until Nelson got some life when Aaron Dunlap scored a shorthanded marker midway through the frame.Less than two minutes later, Carsen Willans scored his first of the post season on a mad scramble in front of Beaver Valley goalie Jarrod Schamerhorn.It was the longest wait between goal and celebration on record as referee Mike Paige needed what seemed like an eternity to consult with his linesmen before confirming the Nelson goal.But the Hawks roared back before the period ended to grab another intermission lead.Ryan Edwards did all the work behind the Nelson net, centering a pass that Keanan Patershuk buried past Soles. “They came hard . . . they were pretty desperate for the win,” said Leaf defenceman Cam Weir.“I thought we weathered the storm pretty well and came back and pushed back quite hard.”Beaver Valley tried to lock down the Leafs in the third. But Bryce Nielsen jammed the puck pasts Schamerhorn with eight minutes remaining in the period to tie the game at 3-3.Leaf captain did most of the work, driving past Hawks defenceman Walker Sidoni and forcing Schamerhorn to cough up a rebound Nielsen pushed into the net.Nelson had a great opportunity early in overtime when Edwards was called for delay of game after shooting the puck over the glass.However, the Hawks were able to kill off that penalty before being awarded their own man advantage when Edwards was hauled down at the Nelson blueline by the Leafs’ Kyler Wilkinson nullifying a potential Beaver Valley breakaway.“We can’t really think that way . . . we’ve got to have a short memory,” Weir said when asked if the Leafs let one slip away in Game four.“We’ve got to forget about it and move on and get ready for (Game five) Thursday.”Tuesday’s win means the series now is a best-of-three affair with the Hawks regaining home ice advantage.“Playing at home is great . . . our fans are great and we’re happy to be playing at home,” Calvin said.ICE CHIPS: Nelson out shot the Hawks for the second straight night, 31-22. . . . After being shutout Monday in Game three, the Hawks got the power play working, going two for seven in the game. Nelson was scoreless in five attempts. . . .Nelson played without the services of forwards Dustin Reimer and Greg Nickel due to injury. . . .If a Game seven is necessary it will be played Saturday in Fruitvale. . . . Before the game, the Leafs recognized the Nelson Atoms winning the West Kootenay Championship over the weekend. . . .Game attendance topped the 600 mark.last_img read more

Plant Intranet Seen in Action

first_imgHow do roots respond to what the top of the plant experiences?  With an elaborate communication system resembling email.The authors of a paper in Science Magazine don’t use the words email or intranet, but the signaling system they describe fits that description:Nitrogen (N) is a critical nutrient for plants but is often distributed unevenly in the soil. Plants therefore have evolved a systemic mechanism by which N starvation on one side of the root system leads to a compensatory and increased nitrate uptake on the other side. Here, we study the molecular systems that support perception of N and the long-distance signaling needed to alter root development. Rootlets starved of N secrete small peptides that are translocated to the shoot and received by two leucine-rich repeat receptor kinases (LRR-RKs). Arabidopsis plants deficient in this pathway show growth retardation accompanied with N-deficiency symptoms. Thus, signaling from the root to the shoot helps the plant adapt to fluctuations in local N availability.These small peptides, in other words, provide information sent from the roots to the growing shoots at the top of the plant.  But that’s not all; the shoot responds to its email with a message back down to the roots.  Bisseling and Scheres describe this communication network in a Perspective article in Science:Therefore, plants integrate local and global nutrient cues to spend resources efficiently. On page 343 in this issue, Tabata et al. (1) identify a peptide signaling mechanism by which the root locally senses N limitation in the soil, and communicates with the shoot, which then signals back to the root to stimulate lateral root growth in regions with a high nitrate content to facilitate nitrate uptake.The system presupposes that cells in the shoot can “read” the peptide, understand it, and respond appropriately. Ditto for the reader down underground.Scientists cannot yet “read” the email messages.  “The nature of the signal from the shoot that triggers lateral root foraging behavior in the +N compartment remains to be resolved,” Bisseling and Scheres state.  But like watching two parties communicate in a foreign language and then respond with actions, the scientists can tell that communication is occurring.   It’s not sentient communication, as with human verbal communication.  It’s more like computer language: preprogrammed, digital, and responsive.  A designer would look at this and say, “Aha!”From an engineering perspective, it makes perfect sense to decide centrally (in the shoot) whether the overall nutrient status is adequate, and then send systemic signals to stimulate growth everywhere except where the local inhibition system is active.The Japanese team provides more evidence of an intranet.  The system looks like one office communicating both with itself and with distant departments of the company:Nitrate uptake systems are under control by both cell-autonomous local signaling triggered by nitrate itself and systemic long-distance signaling that transduces external and internal N status across spatially distant root compartments.By blocking the return email, the researchers figured they could learn whether the signals are necessary.  Indeed, they were.  By mutating the CEP gene that codes the emails, the plants became nitrogen starved. “These phenotypic and transcriptional analyses suggest that CEP signaling is likely to underlie N starvation responses and, accordingly, its overactivation or blockage leads to pleiotropic developmental effects in both roots and shoots.”This is another example of intra-plant communication that has been coming to light over the last few decades.  “Small molecules such as secreted peptides can mediate long-distance signaling,” the authors say.  The peptide messages, moreover, are preprogrammed in DNA: “The genes that encode small peptide signals are often parts of large families of genes with overlapping and redundant functions.”Although they tested their hypothesis with a lab plant, the system they described is operative throughout the plant world.  This means that a needle on a giant redwood hundreds of feet in the sky is capable to communicating, in principle with its roots underground.  A plant may not be able to walk around, but its intranet and email system gives it a sophisticated way to respond to changing conditions in a holistic way:Plants, as sessile organisms, continuously face a complex array of environmental fluctuations and have evolved sophisticated responses to cope with them. Given that CEP family peptides are conserved throughout vascular plants except for ferns, peptide-mediated root-to-shoot-to-root long-distance signaling is likely to be a general strategy employed by all higher plants for environmental adaptation.It seems odd to claim that plants “have evolved sophisticated responses‘, given that the peptides they studied “are conserved” (i.e., unevolved) throughout the plant kingdom.  The researchers never got around to explaining how this evolution happened.  Would a blind, unguided process produce a “sophisticated” anything, especially one that is functionally effective and information-rich?We’ve been reporting on this phenomenon since 2001 (see links in 4/26/07 entry).  Isn’t this great?  It’s exciting to think that your potted plant has its own intranet and email system!  Tell your office friends about it at the water cooler if there is a potted plant nearby.  Tell your kids about it on the nature trail.The evolution-talk is so useless (see 10/19/14).  Secular scientists have a bad habit of claiming that things “have evolved,” no matter how complex the system under consideration. It’s even worse when they say that plants “have evolved… to” do something.  That’s nonsense in Darwinian theory; nothing “evolves to” reach a goal.  Darwinism is a restatement of the Stuff Happens Law.  Nothing happens “for the purpose of” anything else.  Darwin was supposed to rid biology of teleology, remember?Look: the system is composed of multiple interacting parts (irreducibly complex), and it involves signaling for a function (complex specified information).  These are the hallmarks of intelligent design.  Both parties, root and shoot, have to know the language and the protocol; they use a language convention.  What if the root sent a message to the shoot, and the shoot responded with gobbledygook?  The entire system has to work, or else nothing works.  Every case of a language convention used for signal and response in which we know the origin of the system is the result of intelligent causes.Having dismissed the illogic of evolutionary theory, can we now step back and enjoy the wonder of what science has discovered about plants?  They have an intranet!  They use email!  The proper response should be joy, wisdom, and worship for the Creator who told us that He made these marvels on the third day of creation (Genesis 1:11-13).  Doesn’t it make sense that the God who communicates within Himself in the persons of the Trinity and with His creation would design beings capable of communication?  It makes perfect sense.  Science should have been looking for this.  The Bible presaged it by stating, “In the beginning was the Word” (John 1:1).  The Word is a Person who communicates, giving light to every man.Incidentally, William Dembski has a new book out this month, Being as Communion, in which he makes a rigorous case for including “information” as the fundamental entity in the universe (see his video clips on the website).  It should be an interesting read.  After The Design Inference and No Free Lunch, it’s his third major treatise making the philosophical case for intelligent design (see Evolution News & Views).  As a mathematician and philosopher, Dembski brings exceptional scholarship to the design debate.  His strength is in making the case for ID robust against all possible criticisms from evolutionists and secular materialists.  As important as the bare-bones case for ID is philosophically and academically, it cannot heal the soul.  The late creation scientist A. E. Wilder-Smith (also a scholar with three earned PhD’s) also taught that information is a fundamental entity in the universe, but as a joyful, devout Christian, he used his scholarly logic to preach the gospel.  If ID doesn’t get you to the God who made you, it leaves you incomplete, unfulfilled, and lost in a silent universe.  Communicate with your Creator today.  He sent you the message; now it’s your turn to respond. (Visited 35 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

10 months agoSao Paulo defender Rodrigo Caio missed Barcelona move over medical concerns

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Sao Paulo defender Rodrigo Caio missed Barcelona move over medical concernsby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveSao Paulo defender Rodrigo Caio underwent a Barcelona medical – though missed out on a move this week.Globoesporte says Caio underwent a medical with a Barcelona club doctor who was sent to Brazil, following concerns which previously saw Atletico Madrid and Valencia having pulled out of deals for the 25-year-old.The physical condition of the defender eventually led Barcelona to instead opt for Jeison Murillo, who joined the club on loan from Valencia on Thursday.The deal for Caio would have been a free loan move with an obligatory purchase option worth €15m. last_img read more

Canada has options to bolster competitiveness without corporate tax cuts

first_imgOTTAWA – In its search for ways to blunt threats to Canadian competitiveness, the federal government could avoid the pricey move of cutting corporate taxes by turning to an increasingly discussed option: allowing all companies to immediately write off new equipment purchases.For months, the Liberal government has been under pressure from corporate Canada to respond to a U.S. tax overhaul that many fear will lure business investment south of the border.The Trump administration’s changes include loosening regulations and significant tax reductions for businesses, which have created fears Canada has lost some of its advantages as an investment destination.Many stakeholders in the Canadian business community have been vocal about the need for Finance Minister Bill Morneau to introduce corporate tax cuts of his own as a way to maintain the country’s edge.There are, however, also recommendations Morneau take a close look at a change in the recent U.S. tax package that will enable American companies to immediately write off the full cost of new machinery and equipment. Canada already offers this provision for its manufacturing sector and there are calls for it to be broadened to cover all industries.Business leaders, including RBC president and CEO Dave McKay, have suggested replicating this change in Canada would be a good way to help keep investment dollars from flowing south of the border. McKay has insisted that investment has already started to leave Canada.Some experts believe this kind of measure should be coupled with cuts to business taxes.But others think tax reductions may not be necessary at all, so long as the government addresses other competitiveness issues.Matching the accelerated capital deduction is one way to keep up with the U.S., said Bruce Ball, vice-president of taxation for Chartered Professional Accountants Canada.In fact, Ball argued that many of Canada’s options aren’t actually tax related, or could perhaps only include a small tax reduction.Moves like this could also help the government avoid absorbing what would likely be the far greater revenue hit of lowering corporate taxes.“The problem is you always want to be making sure what you give up, potentially, in revenue is actually going to change behaviour,” Ball said.“In other words, you’re not going to give a tax break to someone who’s going to do what they’re going to do anyway.”The business community will likely have to wait several months before the government announces any decision on how it intends to support competitiveness.The Finance Department says it will continue with its “detailed analytical work” over the coming months to better understand the impacts of the complex U.S. reforms, which it notes are still being drafted. The minister will continue discussing the issue with business leaders and the public before making a decision how to respond, his spokeswoman, Chloe Luciani-Girouard, wrote in an email.Royce Mendes, director and senior economist for CIBC World Markets, said given the fact it’s still early for the impacts of the reforms to appear in the economic data, he sees some merit in Ottawa’s wait-and-see approach as a way to avoid immediately following the U.S. “down the rabbit hole of tax cuts.”Mendes also pointed to the less aggressive step of allowing accelerated depreciation for eligible capital expenditures, similar to the U.S. change, as a way of inducing capital spending.Support, Mendes added, could also come from the Bank of Canada in the form of lower interest rates, which would help encourage more corporate borrowing and maintain a weaker exchange rate that by itself can help raise the country’s competitiveness.Last month, the Bank of Canada estimated the U.S. reforms could lower business investment by about three per cent from 2017 to the end of 2020. The bank said this would drop the level of economic growth by about 0.2 per cent by the end of 2020.But when it comes to the accelerated depreciation option on its own, there are worries it wouldn’t do enough to help Canadian competitiveness.Jack Mintz, a University of Calgary tax-policy expert, said the incentive would only help certain types of businesses, while companies in a loss position wouldn’t be able to take full advantage of it.Canada, he said, offered accelerated depreciation for all sectors for many years, up until the mid-1980s.“We really need to remember our lessons from many years ago that accelerated depreciation works, but it’s limited in its impact and it also creates a lot of problems for the system when it becomes very commonly used,” Mintz said.“The best response to (the U.S. changes) is lowering your corporate rate a bit to take some of the pressure off.”Morneau himself has been criticized for not including specific measures in his February budget to help offset the U.S. changes. He’s under pressure to move quickly.“We do believe that Canada’s competitive,” Morneau said Thursday during an appearance before a parliamentary committee.“We do know, however, that there’s always more work to be done… We do see competitiveness as much more than trade, and that’s very important, (and) much more than taxes, although that’s very important.”Follow @AndyBlatchford on Twitterlast_img read more

Bumrah Shami Jadeja and Poonam recommended for Arjuna

first_imgNew Delhi: The Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) on Saturday recommended the names of Jasprit Bumrah, Mohammed Shami, Ravindra Jadeja and Poonam Yadav for the Arjuna Award. The Supreme Court-appointed Committee of Administrators (CoA) met in the Capital to discuss the matter in the presence of GM Cricket Operations Saba Karim. Karim had proposed the names of the cricketers. Bumrah has been an integral part of the Indian side in recent times and will be leading the bowling attack for India at the World Cup. Shami has also been in great form in recent times and made a remarkable comeback into the Indian limited-overs side after being considered only for the longer format in the last couple of seasons. Jadeja, who till recently was only part of the Indian Test side, has also made a return to the limited overs team and has been picked as the third spinner in the 15-member squad for the World Cup in England and Wales. Poonam has been deservedly nominated from the women’s team.last_img read more

Big Ten coaches welcome Cornhuskers to conference

The newest team in the Big Ten football conference, Nebraska, was welcomed with open arms at Big Ten Media Days, where several coaches said they have already seen a positive impact because of the new addition. Wisconsin’s head coach Bret Bielema, whose team opens conference play against the Cornhuskers, said he has already noticed Nebraska’s direct influence on recruiting. “When (Big Ten Commissioner) Jim Delany made the decision to bring Nebraska into our league, bring that name and program, I’ve noticed it overall,” Bielema said. “I’ve noticed it in recruiting. “I can’t tell you how many times I’ve had parents or recruits sitting in my office talking about the Big Ten Network and the exposure that it brings, to bring Nebraska in, and for us to be a part of the Leaders Division for the first time in college football history…” Penn State’s head coach Joe Paterno said that while he was at one point an outspoken advocate for adding an eastern team to the conference, he feels “extremely good” about the Cornhuskers’ selection. They will bring an added toughness to the conference, he said at Big Ten Media Days, which took place last Thursday and Friday in Chicago. “When we got Nebraska, that was a real coup. It’s going to make the league tougher,” Paterno said. “The tougher the other guy is, the better you get, if you’re a competitor.” For Michigan State coach Mark Dantonio, the move is a positive not just for individual teams but for the conference as a whole. “With Nebraska coming into the conference, I think it gives us, the conference as a whole, strengthens our brand,” Dantonio said. Kirk Ferentz, the head coach at Iowa, was especially excited about the possibility of a new rivalry due to Iowa and Nebraska’s shared border. “It’s certainly, I think, something that is going to be something very much of interest for the fans,” Ferentz said. “I remember coming to Iowa in 1981, there were probably more Nebraska fans than Iowa fans. Hopefully that’s changed a little bit, but time will tell.” In hopes of spurring the rivalry, the Cornhuskers and the Hawkeyes announced at Media Days that they will play in the conference’s newest trophy game, the Heroes Game. The game, which will be played on the last Friday in November this year, will honor one hero from Iowa and one from Nebraska. Despite other coaches’ enthusiasm, no coach was more excited than the Cornhuskers’ coach, Bo Pelini, who said he thinks Nebraska is a good fit for the Big Ten. “I think if you look at the tradition, academic integrity, all the things that I believe our program at the University of Nebraska stands for, I think we fit right in with this conference,” Pelini said. “Tremendous football, tremendous athletics, a tremendous commitment to academics, and doing things the right way. That’s what this conference is all about.” Pelini said facing all new opponents will require more time and preparation from his team in order to be a strong competitor. “We basically had 11 new opponents on our schedule which creates a little bit of a challenge for our football team and our kids,” Pelini said. Still, he said he has no plans to drastically alter his style of play. “We’re going to do what we do and we’re going to do it well,” he said. “We’re not really going to adapt what we do to the conference. We’re going to hopefully make the conference adapt to what we do.”  OSU will face the Cornhuskers this season in Lincoln, Neb., on Oct. 8. read more